Staff

Dr. Steven Cooke

Steven Cooke is a Canada Research Professor in the Institute of Environmental and Interdisciplinary Sciences and Department of Biology at Carleton University. Dr. Cooke is the Director of the CEBC.  Research in his lab focuses on conservation science, environmental evidence, applied ecology, and the human dimensions of natural resource management.  He is particularly active in freshwater and marine systems but has broad taxonomic, geographical, and realm interests.  Cooke also serves as Secretary of the College of the Royal Society of Canada and is Editor in Chief of the journal “Conservation Physiology”.

Contact – steven.cooke@carleton.ca


Dr. Joseph Bennett

Joseph Bennett is an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Environmental and Interdisciplinary Sciences and Department of Biology at Carleton University. He is a co-director of the Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Laboratory (GLEL). Research in his lab focuses on conservation prioritization, invasion ecology, optimal monitoring, biogeography and spatial statistics. Dr. Bennett has a particular interest in applied questions regarding management to protect threatened species and invasive species control. He also works on theoretical questions regarding the value of monitoring information and the determinants of community assembly in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.


Dr. Vivian Nguyen

Dr. Vivian Nguyen is an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Environmental and Interdisciplinary Sciences and Department of Biology at Carleton University. Her research focuses on the interface of science, society and policy within the themes of environmental change, natural resource management, and food insecurity. Dr. Nguyen is a Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellow alumni, and spent two years working in the Office of the Chief Scientist at Natural Resources Canada to better understand the challenges of and opportunities for science policy integration. She continues to conduct research to understand the mobilization of scientific knowledge, as well as other ways of knowing, into decisions, policy, and practice. She also has a particular interest in the human dimensions of environmental issues, including fisheries and other natural resources management, and how human perceptions and behaviours can lead to successful or unsuccessful conservation/management strategies and policy initiatives. 


Dr. Trina Rytwinski

Dr. Rytwinski completed her PhD at Carleton University in 2012 working with Dr. Lenore Fahrig in the Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Research Lab (GLEL). There she studied the circumstances in which roads and traffic affect wildlife populations. After taking some maternity leave, she returned to the GLEL as a Post-doctoral fellow with Dr. Fahrig (2013-2016) focusing on two main road ecology themed topics; (1) determining ways to improve knowledge on the influence of mitigation measures on wildlife populations through experiments, and (2) assessing the effectiveness of mitigation measures intended to decrease road related impacts on wildlife through meta-analysis. Trina joined the Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation in 2016 where she works as a project manager conducting evidence syntheses and meta-analyses to help inform various Canadian government agencies. Trina is also a Research Associate, working with Dr. Steven Cooke (Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab) and Dr. Joseph Bennett (Bennett Lab/GLEL), and Instructor at Carleton University. Trina is endorsed as a Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE) trainer  and has co-developed an introductory evidence synthesis workshop.

Contact – trinarytwinski@cunet.carleton.ca


Jessica Taylor

Jessica received her MSc in Biology from Carleton University in 2012 where she studied the effects of oxidative stress on sockeye salmon in the Fraser River. She rejoined the Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab in 2016 as a lab manager and research biologist and provides support for graduate student projects and assists with grant writing and coordination. Jessica is also a project manager at the Canadian Centre for Evidence Based Conservation and conducts evidence syntheses, including systematic reviews and systematic maps, under the guidance of the Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE) for clients here in Canada including Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada as well as abroad in Sweden and the United Kingdom. Jessica is an endorsed CEE trainer and has co-developed an introductory evidence synthesis workshop. Since 2017, she has been the Communications Officer for the CEE and in 2018 stepped in as the Secretary of the CEE Board of Trustees.

Contact – jessicataylor3@cunet.carleton.ca


Lisa Donaldson

Lisa completed her BSc. in Environmental Science at Carleton University, where she was first joined the Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab in 2006. Since then, she has worked for the Science branch of Fisheries and Oceans Canada where she provided scientific and technical support for the management of Pacific salmon in the Fraser River watershed. She rejoined Carleton University in 2014 as a lab manager and research biologist where she conducts research, provides management and technical support for graduate students projects, and assists in grant writing and coordination. Lisa is a project manager at the Canadian Centre for Evidence Based Conservation and conducts evidence syntheses, including systematic reviews and systematic maps, under the guidance of the Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE) for clients in Canada including Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada. Lisa is an endorsed CEE trainer and has co-developed an introductory evidence synthesis workshop.


Adrienne Smith

Adrienne earned her MSc in Biology from University of Waterloo in 2014 where she studied the impacts of varying flow from a hydroelectric dam on the food web and critical spawning habitat of Lake Sturgeon and Walleye. She work as an aquatic biologist for the Ministry of Natural Resources in Thunder Bay before she joined the Canadian Center for Evidence Based Conservation as a research assistant in February of 2019. She conducts evidence syntheses under the guidance of the CEBC’s project managers and following protocols developed under the Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE). She is primarily focused on a systematic review of the extent to which fish passage facilities and culverts allow upstream and downstream passage of fish at barriers.


Albana Berberi

Albana Berberi completed her MSc in Environmental Sustainability at the University of Ottawa in 2019. During her studies, she researched how Indigenous knowledge is incorporated in Canadian national park management plans, and policy recommendations to increase future incorporation. Albana has also worked in Canadian federal departments, including Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Indigenous Services Canada, where she provided support in research, website development, and public communication. For her master’s capstone project, she partnered with the Forum for Leadership on Water to analyze provincial and territorial water policies, as well as create recommendations for an increased federal role. Albana is currently an Environmental Evidence Data Technician at the Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation. 


Students

Dirk Algera

Dirk completed a MSc in biology from Carleton University (2016) studying the effects of cortisol on Smallmouth Bass behaviour and reproduction. He is currently a PhD Candidate at Carleton University in the Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Lab studying the risks among fish movement behaviour (various salmonids) and hydropower facility operations. Dirk is a contributing researcher at the Canadian Centre for Evidence Based Conservation (CEBC), conducting evidence syntheses (systematic reviews) under the guidance of CEBC project managers and following guidelines outlined by the Collaboration for Environmental Evidence. He is focused on a systematic review of fish injury and mortality associated with entrainment and impingement at hydropower facilities.


Meagan Harper

Meagan received her BSc in Environmental Science from Carleton University in 2017. She joined the Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation in 2018 as a contractor working on a systematic map investigating the impact of flow regime changes on fish productivity. She recently started her MSc in Biology, co-supervised by Dr. Steven Cooke (FECPL), Dr. Joseph Bennett (Bennett Lab/Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Research Lab), and Dr. Trina Rytwinski (CEBC) at Carleton University. For her thesis, she will be conducting a systematic review on a subtopic (i.e., evidence cluster) identified from the flow regime changes systematic map.

Affiliates

Dr. Nathan Young, University of Ottawa

Dr. Graeme Auld, Carleton University

Dr. Jesse Vermaire, Carleton University

Dr. Susan Aitken, Carleton University